Lounge

The lounge-diner is a big space that extends up the stairs to the first-floor landing. There is no archway or other feature to divide up the space, so all these areas had to be the same colour. I did consider building an archway between the lounge and dining area, but never got around to it in the end...

The colour had to be chosen carefully to make the best use of light and to make the space feel airy. I decided on Dulux Orchid White within the first few months of living there - long before the TV schedules were dominated with property development programmes telling everyone to paint their houses magnolia!

Lounge
Lounge

These two views show the lounge-diner. It was an overcast day, and the carpet is dark blue, but it still looks quite light and open. As you can see, I've had to seriously tidy up and down-size the AV system for the house sale! The hi-fi rack has been moved upstairs, and the system basically consists of a $ky box, a Sony DVD player and the Denon receiver that I bought for the workshop. The ATCs have been displaced by the Rogers LS3/5a's. Still, it's an enjoyable system.

Lounge
Lounge

Here's the view from the other side, showing the staircase and the useful under-stair storage area.

Lounge
Lounge

These two views show the dining area. Again, I've had to clear away a lot of my junk - there used to be 3 pairs of speakers stored under the window sill!

Newel cap (9K)
Painted newel cap (9K)

The original newel post cap had been damaged at some point before we moved in, so I had to clone the cap. Once cut this to size, it needed round-over detail to the top, and a chamfer to the sides. A fun little job!

As you can see, I removed the planks of wood from the stairs to paint the woodwork. So, any white paint that you can on these planks was nothing to do with me! When refitting them, I even bought brand-new brass screws as the old ones were looking a bit tarnished. I bet no-one ever notices!

Closeup showing stair detail (6K)
Closeup of glossed window sill (8K)

And while we're talking about attention to detail, look carefully at the left image - what you're seeing is the view of the wall as it meets the woodwork of the stairwell - the transition between ground and first floor. It's just a triangle-shaped section of wall, largely hidden by the planks...

Someone had slapped gloss paint there many years ago, and it had never been painted since. Upon removing the planks, I rubbed off the gloss and repainted the now bare plaster to match with the rest of the walls. Again, I bet no-one will ever notice it!

The right image gives you some idea of the results from the gloss system I use. It's Dulux Professional Liquid Gloss, which must be used in conjunction with the correct primer and undercoat. It's harder work than the typical non-drip glosses, and it requires practice to get the technique right (I'm still learning). The objective is to apply a single thin coat on top of the immaculate undercoat and getting the right coverage without runs or bare sections is really tricky. So, preparation is everything - the undercoat must be absolutely perfect as the topcoat doesn't hide anything.

But, it's definitely worth the effort. Visitors notice the mirror-like qualities of the finish, and comment on the silky smooth feel of it. And it wears well - it's a tough finish.

The Porch was painted the same Orchid White, but I haven't really got any decent pictures because I haven't got a wide-angle lens!